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A LITTLE boy suffered excruciating headaches for weeks – with doctors saying he had migraines.

Now the six-year-old is facing a rare and aggressive brain tumor and has needed two serious operations.

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Little Stanley Batten started having headaches in SeptemberCredit: BPM
His worried mum took him to the doctors but they thought he was suffering from migraines

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His worried mum took him to the doctors but they thought he was suffering from migrainesCredit: BPM

Stanley Batten, from Harlow, started having a few headaches last September.

His mum, Kirsty Bramble, took him to the GP to check him out – where they said it was probably migraines.

But the pain got worse and the youngster started having “moments” – which almost felt like a seizure.

He was taken back to the GP but sent home with painkillers, until Kirsty rushed him to hospital when the headaches became very bad.

Doctors almost sent him home, but he had a “moment” and was rushed to Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Tragically, his parents then learned that he had a brain tumor.

Three days later he had surgery to try to drain fluid from his brain, before another operation to try to remove the tumour.

But doctors couldn’t get it all, with a biopsy confirming that Stanley had an ependymoma, a tumor of the primary central nervous system.

The youngster is currently undergoing chemotherapy, but his family wants to raise funds to offer him proton therapy.

His grandfather, John Bramble, said: “In early December 2021, Stanley came from being diagnosed with possible migraines.

“From finding out he had a brain tumour, then being admitted to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) in London, having an operation to drain the fluid from his brain, and then a second operation on next day, which took 13 hours to try and remove the tumor, but they couldn’t remove it all.

“After seven weeks of chemo, they will be told if Manchester or Germany are capable of taking Stanley for proton beam therapy (specialist radiotherapy).

“It will be the financial burden on the family – seven weeks of chemo in London, followed by six weeks of proton therapy in Manchester or Germany, then back to London for seven weeks of chemo. This is just the start.

“Any supplement will afford them the luxury of spending quality time with their son and daughter, who are of course impacted by this family trauma.

“Please help us by donating whatever you can afford. Any little help.”

A brain tumor is a growth of cells in the brain that multiply abnormally and uncontrollably.

Common symptoms include:

  • headache
  • convulsions (fits)
  • persistent urge to vomit (nausea), being sick (vomiting) and drowsiness
  • mental or behavioral changes, such as memory problems or personality changes
  • progressive weakness or paralysis on one side of the body
  • vision or speech problems

Brain tumors can affect people of any age, including children, although they tend to be more common in older people.

More than 11,000 people are diagnosed with a primary brain tumor each year in the UK, around half of which are cancerous.

A biopsy confirmed that Stanley had an ependymoma, a primary central nervous system tumor

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A biopsy confirmed that Stanley had an ependymoma, a primary central nervous system tumorCredit: BPM